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Making A Flower by John Selvia
#1
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Here's a technique for making a flower. It uses the rotate/duplicate technique from my tutorial Repeating Objects In A Circle Quickly, but I'll try to explain the technique in brief here as well.


Start with a blank canvas.

If Rulers aren't showing already, go to the View Menu and turn on the Rulers.

From the top Ruler, drag down a horizontal guideline and from the left Ruler, a vertical guideline so they form a nice crosshair in the middle of the canvas.





Next, create a new layer, call it PETAL, and select it.





Choose the Pen Tool from the tool palette, and make sure your Options (at the top of the screen after you choose the Pen Tool) look like the image below:






Draw the shape of one petal however you'd like. It doesn't have to represent a real-world flower petal, it could be weird, fantasy, alien, whatever.




Now, we're going to convert the path to a selection. We could have drawn a shape instead of a path that then had to be converted to a selection, but what's the harm in learning another tool, eh?


Go to the Paths palette, choose your Work Path (name it if you'd like), then at the bottom of the palette, choose Load Path as a Selection...
So we end up with this.









Now, pick 2 colors that we'll make a gradient out of. I'll use standard whitish flower colors as shown at left..




Then choose the Foreground to Background gradient in the Options bar. Choose Linear as the style, and make sure Transparency is OFF.
Now fill the selection with the gradient so that the darker part of the flower is at the bottom, like so.






Now we'll add a subtle edge to the petal using Inner Glow. Choose it from Layer Style under the Layer Menu (or from the Layers Style icon at the bottom of the Layers Palette).




Here's my settings from the Inner Glow options.




Note I changed the yellow color to a brownish color and changed Blend Mode to Normal. Play with Size and Opacity until you get something like...
This.




One technique I like to do is using half a selection at a time, make a very subtle streak up the middle to give the flower a crease.





Like this.



What you want to avoid is giving the petal a definite light/shadow direction at this time, because when we rotate it, it'll look wrong if you have locked in a light and shadow source-those won't rotate with the petal.
Notice my petal is lit right down the middle for the most part.
At this point, use the Brush tool to add streaks, spots, or whatever you want to make it look more like a flower.

Here's my finished petal. Yeah, it's not too fancy.




Now, duplicate the layer that the petal is on so you end up with 2 copies of the petal.




For this next part, we're going to rotate the duplicate flower petal.
This is based on the technique in my other tutorial, Repeating Objects In A Circle Quickly.





Basically, the idea is to choose Transform/Rotate, move the objects center to the bottom, then OPTION-SHIFT ROTATE (PC: ALT¥SHIFT ROTATE) the duplicate.

Here's the petal after choosing Transform/Rotate.





We have to move it's center point to the bottom of the flower...






Like this. Now when we rotate the object, it'll pivot around the bottom of the petal.


OPTION-SHIFT ROTATE (PC: ALT-SHIFT ROTATE) the duplicate.
Here's our original petal and the rotated one. Now for the rest of the petals.





To rotate and duplicate a layer at the same time, do a COMMAND¥OPTION-SHIFT-T (PC: CONTROL-ALT-SHIFT¥T) over and over until you get...
This.





You'll have a lot of petal layers at this point, so link and merge them all to 1 layer.

Now, duplicate this merged single layer to get a 2nd layer of petals.

Scale and rotate slightly this 2nd layer so it looks like...





This. Not much contrast, so feel free to use Curves or some other technique to boost contrast if you wish. You'll definitely want to apply an Outer Glow to the top layer so it stands out from the bottom layer a bit.

Here's the top layer with Outer Glow applied. Stands out a lot better now.





Now create a circle selection in the middle of the flower and fill it with a gradient that fits with your flower color and design.





Fill the circle with some noise, maybe a few beveled tiny dots, maybe even diffuse the circle to give it that rough "flowery-center" look.





This is what you get when you layer LOTS of petals.





That's it. You're done! Hopefully you'll use this with other elements to make something interesting.
Have fun!









This tutorial is by the late John Selvia, artist, musician, Photoshop guru who also just happened to be a three time Emmy winning graphic artist for television. John was also an adjunct instructor at a design/photography school where he taught Interface Design, Advanced Photoshop, Motion Graphics, 3D, Animation and basic design and illustration classes

John passed away in 2008 and his widow, Lisa Selvia - an artist and college instructor herself - has graciously given her permission to reprint John's fabulous tutorials here.




Posted on: 6/28 8:16
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Re: Fantasy Columns
#2
Not too shy to talk
Not too shy to talk


You make it looks so simple Cliff!! I will have to try this!! Thank you!!

Posted on: 6/24 11:34
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Re: Fasteners part 1: bolts
#3
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You're welcome sed, although I'm just the poster. I got all tuts from boopish and a lot of them areby John Selvia as written at the bottom of the tut

Posted on: 6/22 8:59
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Re: Fasteners part 1: bolts
#4
Just can't stay away
Just can't stay away


Hey,............. Well presented -- Always trying to learn something new to me! THANKZ Cliff

Posted on: 6/21 17:02
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FASTENERS PART 2: SCREWS AND RIVETS
#5
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This time, we're paying tribute to the lowly screw. We'll cover hex screws, phillips screws, single slot screws, and the easiest of the bunch-the rivet.


Start with a silvery gradient for a background, then drag out a horizontal and vertical guide for our crosshairs that we always start with for circular objects.




Then, on a new layer, create a circular selection.




Fill the selection with a Radial Gradient using the Gradient Tool. To simulatte shading, start your gradient in the upper left of the selection (but not right at the edge), and drag to the lower right.
There's a basic rivet, but it needs more...





Choose Layer Menu/Layer Style/Bevel and Emboss, and give the rivet a Pillow Emboss to make it look sunk into the background.

The rivet is done. Now, let's turn it into a single slot screw...




On a New Layer, create a rectangle using the Rectangular Marquee tool. Don't worry if you make it longer than it needs to be.



COMMAND-CLICK (PC: CONTROL-CLICK) the Rivet layer to get a selection, then choose Select Menu/Invert to invert the selection.

Next, hit delete on the slot layer to chop off any excess black bar and to make it conform to the shape of the rivet as shown here.




Hide the slot layer.

Then create a New Layer, choose the Gradient Tool with your basic White to Black gradient (Linear, not Radial), COMMAND-CLICK (PC: CONTROL-CLICK) the slot layer to get a selection, and create the gradient you see below.



Then rotate (Edit Menu/Transform/Rotate) the slot to match the direction the light is coming from as shown.



To make it look like it's sticking up from theh background, give it a slight shadow (Layer Menu/Layer Style/Drop Shadow).


If on the other hand you want it to look countersunk into the background, use Pillow Emboss instead of a shadow.



The Phillips Head version shown here is made by creating 2 black bars perpendicular to each other instead of 1 black bar, merging the 2 black bars, creating a selection from them, hiding them, then on a New Layer, do the same thing you did to the single slot version with a gradient, then in the end, Bevel the slot.




The Hex Screw version is easy enough. Choose the Polygon Tool, make sure it has 6 sides, then basically do the same thing you did to get a Phillips version, ending with a Bevel as shown.
Note the direction of the gradient inside the slot and the direction of the highlight and shadow of the Bevel.




And of course, our weathered, dirty, pitted screw from the tutorial - Dirty Pitted Metal.
How'd I get the more metallic look in this image?
Curves.



This tutorial is by the late John Selvia, artist, musician, Photoshop guru who also just happened to be a three time Emmy winning graphic artist for television. John was also an adjunct instructor at a design/photography school where he taught Interface Design, Advanced Photoshop, Motion Graphics, 3D, Animation and basic design and illustration classes

John passed away in 2008 and his widow, Lisa Selvia - an artist and college instructor herself - has graciously given her permission to reprint John's fabulous tutorials here.



Posted on: 6/21 9:15
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Fasteners part 1: bolts
#6
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FASTENERS PART 1: BOLTS


This begins our multi-part tutorial on fasteners. We'll be covering screws, hex screws, zippers, and today's lesson-bolts.


Like so many of our circular-based tutorials, start with a crosshair by dragging out guides from the horizontal and vertical rulers.

Then, using the Elliptical Marquee tool, drag out a circular selection from the center where the crosshairs meet.






On a New Layer, fill this selection with the copper gradient, using Linear Gradient instead of Radial, then desaturate it to get a greyish metallic look.



Then using techniques you learned in Tutorial Dirty, Pitted Metal, dirty up the disc. It might be helpful to create the dirtied up version on a separate layer, then use one of the Layer Modes to blend the two together.




This will be the flange or washer coming off the bolthead.

On a New Layer, choose the Polygon Tool, and give it 6 sides in the Option bar at the top of the screen.
Drag it out from the center where the crosshairs meet.




Hide the white shape you just made, choose the dirty pitted flange layer, COMMAND-CLICK (PC: CONTROL-CLICK) the white shape layer to get a selection, then copy and paste from the flange layer, which gives you a bolt-shaped dirty pitted metal shape.




Here's the 2 layers we have right now. I renamed them "bolthead" and "flange".



About the only thing left to do is apply bevels (Layer Menu/Layer Style/Bevel and Emboss), cast a shadow (Layer Menu/Layer Style/Shadow) from the bolthead, and if you want, add some texture to both layers using Bevel and Emboss' Texture Attribute.



Next in the fastener series: Screws and Rivets.



This tutorial is by the late John Selvia, artist, musician, Photoshop guru who also just happened to be a three time Emmy winning graphic artist for television. John was also an adjunct instructor at a design/photography school where he taught Interface Design, Advanced Photoshop, Motion Graphics, 3D, Animation and basic design and illustration classes

John passed away in 2008 and his widow, Lisa Selvia - an artist and college instructor herself - has graciously given her permission to reprint John's fabulous tutorials here.





Posted on: 6/14 8:36
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Fantasy Columns
#7
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FANTASY COLUMNS

Here's a great technique I came up with which works the same way as my Corrugated Pipe tutorial, but with stone instead of metal. It's great for creating columns for your fantasy illustrations.

First, on a New Layer, make a rectangular vertical selection. Leave room at the top and bottom. Name the layer "column texture".




Next, fill the selection with tan and dark brown (almost black) clouds (Filter Menu/Render/Clouds). Adjust so there's some nice contrast between light and dark using Curves or Contrast/Brightness. Keep that selection on for the next step.




Next, on a New Layer ABOVE the cloudy one, fill the selection with a Copper Gradient from left to right, then desaturate (Image Menu/Adjustments/Desaturate) the copper to get a gray gradient. Name this layer "shading tube".



Here's our Layer Palette so far.




Still with me? :)

The next step is to use one of PhotoShop's Layer Blending Modes to cause the shading tube to give depth to the column texture layer, similar to how we used a layer mode to make the corrugated pipe three-dimensional. We want to use the overlay mode to achieve this effect. Choose it now at the top of the Layer Palette.



Which gives us this. No drawing experience necessary, we let PhotoShop do all the work.

Go ahead and merge the shading tube layer and the column texture layer.

By the way, to keep the name "shading tube" after you merge, choose it, then link the "column texture" layer, then choose "Merge Linked" from the Layer Palette Options menu.

If you had chosen the column texture then merged, the newly created layer would be "column texture"




The next series of steps involves creating our flutes for the column.

This is probably the longest part of the tutorial since we have to make a flute shape, duplicate it, scale the duplicate sideways a small amount, move it, then duplicate that one, scale it sideways a bit, move it, etc.

On a New Layer, create the first flute shape using the Rounded Rectangle tool.




OPTION-DRAG (PC:ALT-DRAG) a copy to the right, and scale it sideways ever so slightly using Edit Menu/Transform/Scale.
Look at the image below.





Then do the same thing to the 2nd flute shape-OPTION-DRAG (PC: ALT-DRAG) to the right, scale it sideways slightly, put it a little closer to the 2nd flute shape than the 2nd flute shape is to the first one.

Breathe.



And again...




And again then we're done with this side.



We now need to merge all of the flute shape layers except the center one by linking them together in the Layer Palette, then in the Layer Palette Option menu, choose Merge Linked.



Now we need to move a copy of this group to the other side of the column, but facing the other way.

To get this group to the other side of the column and flip it, duplicate the group, then use Edit Menu/Transform/Flip Horizontal on the duplicate group, move it to the other side, and you have the same group on the other side.

Merge both groups, then scale the single layer so the flute shapes fit inside the column width like the image below.



Remember how on our other tutorials, we used white shapes as a means to get a selection? That's what we need here. COMMAND-CLICK (PC: CONTROL-CLICK) the white shape layer to get a selection. Choose the shading tube layer, Copy, then Paste. This creates a new layer of flutes that have the shading tube texture.

Get rid of the white shapes layer or hide it. Call the layer "flutes"

Here's our palette right now.




The only thing really left to do is to Bevel the flutes layer to create the illusion that they are carved into the column.




Choose Layer Menu/Layer Style/Bevel and Emboss, then adjust to taste using the down direction, and of course, using color highlights instead of white highlights. :)
Then you can add the top and bottom parts using a similar technique as the column but without the flutes. I wish now that I had contrasted the original shading tube to give a bit more roundness to the column, but that's something you can do on yours!

Here's an example with 3 columns (obviously duplicated since the texture is the same on all of them).








This tutorial is by the late John Selvia, artist, musician, Photoshop guru who also just happened to be an Emmy winning graphic artist for television, as well as a college level instructor in graphic design.. John passed away in 2008 and his widow, Lisa Selvia - an artist and college instructor herself - has graciously given her permission to reprint John's fabulous tutorials here.




Posted on: 6/7 9:00
Visit my webshop http://www.pinchetti.com
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Re: Doing the Dance
#8
Not too shy to talk
Not too shy to talk


Buttons were my main bug a boo when first learning to skin. This, and the glass button tutorial really helped me get the basics right. After that, the sky was my limit and buttons no longer had me flummoxed!!!

Posted on: 6/2 23:17
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Doing the Dance
#9
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A lot of what I do in Interface Design relies on objects or elements being centrally located to each other (see examples on my Glass Buttons tutorial). The way to do this effectively is to create guides that form a cross-hair to bring out all your shapes. Concentric rings are the basis of buttons, framed objects like windows or portals, even console monitors in high-tech design.


First, turn on Snap under the View window, so your cross-hairs snap to the middle of the image. This avoids guessing at where the image's center is.
Setting Snap is ONLY important if whatever you're making needs to be centered in the image. If you're simply creating concentric circles and don't care where the object lands, you can skip this step.





Next, turn on Rulers (View Menu). With Rulers showing, you can drag out your guides to form the cross-hair.
Drag out a horizontal guide and a vertical guide from your Rulers, so they meet in the middle.






Create a large circle by choosing the Elliptical marquee tool in the Tool Palette and placing the tool in the center of the crosshair formed by the guides.
Hold down OPTION-SHIFT(PC: ALT-SHIFT) to drag out a circle from the center of the cross-hairs. If you only hold Shift, you don't center it. If you only hold Option(PC: ALT), it turns into an ellipse. Holding down both creates a perfect circle coming out from the center.



We want concentric rings, so we need to subtract from the big circle selection.
This is tricky, so read carefully.
First, we need to hold Option(PC:ALT) ONLY in order to subtract from the selection, but as we have said, Option by itself (PC:ALT) gives you an ellipse. So start dragging with Option (PC:ALT) by itself, then while you're dragging, hit the Shift key (let go of the Option(PC:ALT) key), then add the Option (PC:ALT) key while holding the Shift and scale to the desired size.
It's a tricky dance, but once you've done it a few times, it'll make more sense. You should have something like what's below.



To do the next smaller set of rings, you need to start with the Shift instead of Option (PC:ALT) because Shift lets you add instead of subtract to a selection.
Do the dance several more times until you get something like what I have here.



Then all that's left is to fill the selection with the color of your choice... And here's our concentric rings.



The techniques works with squares as well.



You can use the technique for ellipses or rectangles too, but you don't want to hold the Shift except to add to the selection, because Shift gives us a perfect circle or square.
To make ellipses and rectangles instead, make circles and squares first, then scale them in one direction.


Posted on: 5/31 9:01
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Re: Creating Alien text
#10
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Thanks for stipulating that Betty! I'm glad we can make it available to all

Posted on: 5/29 9:18
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